Is the Shape of a Genome as Important as Its content?

October 29, 2010Is the shape of a genome as important as its content?

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The laboratory of Ken-ichi Noma, Ph.D., an assistant professor at the Wistar Institute, has produced the first detailed structure of the fission yeast genome. The researchers demonstrate how the physical structure of the genome itself helps cells regulate and control gene expression. Credit: Ken-ichi Noma, Ph.D./The Wistar Institute

If there is one thing that recent advances in genomics have revealed, it is that our genes are interrelated, “chattering” to each other across separate chromosomes and vast stretches of DNA. According to researchers at The Wistar Institute, many of these complex associations may be explained in part by the three-dimensional structure of the entire genome. A given cell’s DNA spends most of its active lifetime in a tangled clump of chromosomes, which positions groups of related genes near to each other and exposes them to the cell’s gene-controlling machinery. This structure, the researchers say, is not merely the shape of the genome, but also a key to how it works.

Read the article in PhysOrg.com

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About carlos

I'm a curious person, of reasonable intellect, "on the beach" (retired) and enjoying my interest in anthropology, language, civil rights, and a few other areas. I've been a hippie/student/aerospace tech writer in the '60s, a witness to the Portuguese revolution in the ‘70s, a defense test engineer and witness to the Guatemalan genocide in the '80s, and a network engineer for an ISP in the '90s. Now I’m a student and commentator until my time is up. I've spent time under the spell of the Mesoamerican pyramids and the sweet sound of the Portuguese language. I've lived in Europe, traveled in Brazil, Central America, Iceland, New Zealand, and other places. My preferred mode of travel is with a backpack and I eat (almost) anything local. Somehow, many of the countries I have been to have had civil unrest (for which I was not responsible). I'm open to correspond with anyone who might share my liberal, humanist interests. I live in San Buenaventura, California.
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