Kleifarvatn Lake Leak Looking Bad: Huldufólk blamed?

Although Huldufólk play an important part in Icelandic culture they have occasionally caused mischief when irritated or disrespected.  Sometimes mysterious, the Huldufólk are a part of the mystical, hidden spirituality of Iceland.
Icelanders are accustomed to their land being stretched, split, and torn by violent earthquakes and haphazardly rebuilt by exploding volcanoes. But everyone was surprised when a large lake began to disappear into a long fissure created by one of last summer’s earthquakes.

The draining lake is an oddity even by Icelandic standards, and has lured hordes of curious onlookers to it barren shores.  “If you put your ear to the ground, you can hear the lake draining,” said geologist Amy Clifton of the Nordic Volcanological Institute in Reykjavik, Iceland. “It sounds like water going down the sink.”


Last year, during a leisurely Sunday drive, a geologist noticed a large gash in the landscape about 20 kilometers (13 miles) from Reykjavik and reported it to Clifton. When she arrived she found a fissure—about a foot wide and 400 meters (1,280 feet) long—that led directly into Lake Kleifarvatn and disappeared beneath the water.
Lake Kleifarvatn, which measured about six kilometers (3.7 miles) long and 2.3 kilometers (1.4 miles) wide last year, has shrunk dramatically. Now it is only 3.5 kilometers long and roughly 1.8 kilometers wide, said Clifton.Read more… 

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About carlos

I'm a curious person, of reasonable intellect, "on the beach" (retired) and enjoying my interest in anthropology, language, civil rights, and a few other areas. I've been a hippie/student/aerospace tech writer in the '60s, a witness to the Portuguese revolution in the ‘70s, a defense test engineer and witness to the Guatemalan genocide in the '80s, and a network engineer for an ISP in the '90s. Now I’m a student and commentator until my time is up. I've spent time under the spell of the Mesoamerican pyramids and the sweet sound of the Portuguese language. I've lived in Europe, traveled in Brazil, Central America, Iceland, New Zealand, and other places. My preferred mode of travel is with a backpack and I eat (almost) anything local. Somehow, many of the countries I have been to have had civil unrest (for which I was not responsible). I'm open to correspond with anyone who might share my liberal, humanist interests. I live in San Buenaventura, California.
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