Vagrant Monarchs of the Left Coast

I live in San Buenaventura, California where a rogue breed of West Coast Monarchs (Danaus plexippus var occidentalis) migrate to a different drummer.  The one’s that migrate down from Canada and the Eastern US migrate South to the mountains of central Mexico.  It’s a long trip for them.

 

Here in San Buenaventura our western Monarchs come down the coast and are enthralled by Eucalyptus microclimates on the coast.  Here they find what their Eastern cousins fly so far for.  I don’t really know if there is actually a var. occidentalis but after so many generations of separation from their Eastern cousins there may be.

 

Our microclimate is a small 30-ft barranca populated by frogs and other small creatures and of course 70-ft Eucalyptus.  I’m glad the Monarchs like our neighborhood.  They’re not as colorful nesting in our Eucalyptus, but enough of them break loose to fill the neighborhood with a winsome reminder that there is beauty in the air.  I wish I knew what motivated the Monarchs to nest here but they  care very little for my presence.

West-Coast Monarchs…


Brain ‘GPS’ illuminated in migratory monarch butterflies

January 26, 2011

A new study takes a close look at the brain of the migratory monarch butterfly to better understand how these remarkable insects use an internal compass and skylight cues to navigate from eastern North America to Mexico each fall. The research, published by Cell Press in the January 27 issue of the journal Neuron, provides key insights into how ambiguous sensory signals can be integrated in the brain to guide complex navigation.

Previous research has shown that migrants use a time-compensated “sun compass” to maintain a southerly direction during flight. “In general, this sun compass mechanism proposes that skylight cues providing directional information are sensed by the eyes and that this sensory information is then transmitted to a sun compass system in the ,” explains senior study author, Dr. Steven Reppert from the University of Massachusetts Medical School. “There, information from both eyes is integrated and time compensated for the sun’s movement by a  so that flight direction is constantly adjusted to maintain a southerly bearing over the day.”

Dr. Reppert and coauthor Dr. Stanley Heinze were interested in studying exactly how skylight cues are processed by migrating monarchs and how the skylight pattern of polarized light may provide directional information on cloudy days. “The pattern of linearly polarized skylight is arranged as concentric circles of electric field vectors (E-vectors) around the sun, and they can indicate the sun’s position, even when the sun itself is covered with clouds,” says Dr. Reppert. “However, the symmetrical nature of the polarized skylight pattern leads to directional uncertainty unless the pattern is integrated with the horizontal position of the sun, called the solar azimuth.”

Dr. Heinze compared the neuronal organization of the monarch brain sun compass network to that of the well-characterized desert locust and found it to be remarkably similar. He went on to show that individual neurons in the sun compass were tuned to specific E-vector angles of polarized light, as well as azimuth-dependent responses to unpolarized light. Interestingly, the responses of individual neurons to these two different stimuli were mediated through different parts of the monarch eye. The responses were then integrated in the sun compass part of the monarch brain to form an accurate representation of skylight cues throughout the day.

Advertisements

About carlos

I'm a curious person, of reasonable intellect, "on the beach" (retired) and enjoying my interest in anthropology, language, civil rights, and a few other areas. I've been a hippie/student/aerospace tech writer in the '60s, a witness to the Portuguese revolution in the ‘70s, a defense test engineer and witness to the Guatemalan genocide in the '80s, and a network engineer for an ISP in the '90s. Now I’m a student and commentator until my time is up. I've spent time under the spell of the Mesoamerican pyramids and the sweet sound of the Portuguese language. I've lived in Europe, traveled in Brazil, Central America, Iceland, New Zealand, and other places. My preferred mode of travel is with a backpack and I eat (almost) anything local. Somehow, many of the countries I have been to have had civil unrest (for which I was not responsible). I'm open to correspond with anyone who might share my liberal, humanist interests. I live in San Buenaventura, California.
This entry was posted in Environment and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.