Lago Izabal May Hold Mayan Gold Treasures

If this proves to be true, there will be more than a few  embarrassed  Guatemalan and foreign archaeologists.   Rittstieg or Rittsteig is a retired math teacher who has a wide range of interests from the Norse Eddas to Southern German dialects to Central America and Mayan studies.  The Rosetta Stone, it may be remembered, was discovered by a French soldier in Napoleon’s campaign to the East.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joachim_Rittstieg

There have been several comments on the story below.  I have appended them at the bottom – carlos

Cracked Mayan Code May Point to 8 Tons of Lost Treasure

Scientist says he deciphered Mayan codex way to sunken treasure in Lake Izabal in Guatemala

Científico alemán

-Todanoticia.com-German mathematician Joachim Rittsteig has dedicated his life to analyzing the so-called Maya Code of Dresden.

A German scientist claims to have cracked the so-called Maya Code of Dresden and discovered one of its chapters for specific information which would lead to a great treasure of gold from a vanished culture in the waters of Lake Izabal in Guatemala.

“The Dresden Maya Code leads to a huge treasure in Guatemala than eight tons of pure gold,” said the mathematician Joachim Rittsteig , 40 years studying the document, in remarks published on Monday (28/02) the German newspaper Bild .

It adds that “on page 52 speaks of the Maya capital of Atlan, which was destroyed by an earthquake on 30 October in the year 666 BC. The city is guarded 2000 156 golden tablets on which the Maya recorded their laws. ”

The treasure was buried near the city in the waters of Lake Izabal, located east of Guatemala, whose remains were found by the German scientist, thanks to radar images taken in the area.

“They can clearly see the remains of the city. In the ruins of a fortress can be seen the stone sarcophagus where they could find the tables 2 000 156 gold. The information I have shown the place with a margin of error 10 cm “said Rittsteig.

The expert, who is currently seeking sponsors for an expedition to Guatemala, estimates that “only the value of gold in the tables stands at 211 million euros (290 million dollars).

Dresden Maya Code, drafted on the year 1250 AD by Mayan priests, is one of the four major documents that remain from that culture and is held by the Saxon State Library , East Germany, since 272 years.

The code was discovered in 1739 in the hands of a wealthy man in Vienna, without knowing how he came to his hands, who gave it to the library in Dresden, which keeps it under glass in his room shielded documentary treasures.

Joachim Rittsteig has devoted almost his entire life to decipher the valuable document, composed by 74 pages long and 3.56 meters for a total of 74 different hieroglyphs.

Dresden Maya Code contains almost all knowledge of Mayan culture, including astronomical and medical, and in his last sheet describes the apocalypse or end of the world, which should take place on December 21, 2012. bl.With information from EFE, Translation Powered by Google Translate

== == ==

The Proyecto Arqueologico Izabal (1989-1993) did extensive 
survey both on land and in the water and found no evidence of 
such a lost El Dorado. We did extensive testing with a proton 
magnetometer of large areas of lake and Rio Dulce. In addition 
we did land survey on every accessible area of the lake and 
river bank, including the area around Livingston. We mapped the 
site across from Livingston and proposed it as a park. Although 
we did not do any excavation there, we felt it might correspond 
to the community described by Cortez as Nito. Again, there was 
no evidence of a sunken city. There were 17 volumes of data 
completed and turned into IDEAH and are available there. The 
project was funded by Shell Oil to do archaeological survey 
in the area where they were doing seismic testing for oil.
 Rebecca Orozco
Director - Center for Lifelong Learning
Cochise College
Sierra Vista Campus: 520-515-5382
Douglas Campus: 520-417-4772
orozcor@cochise.edu
www.cochise.edu/cll

   1. Lost Maya City (Eric Hanneman)
   2. materials concerning Salvadoran archaeology now on
      line/materiales con refrencia a la arqueologia de El Salvasor ya
      disponibles en linea (Karen Olsen Bruhns)
== == ==-
Message: 1
Date: Sun, 6 Mar 2011 13:35:56 -0500
From: Eric Hanneman <primarypredator@nc.rr.com>
To: aztlan@lists.famsi.org
Subject: [Aztlan] Lost Maya City
Message-ID: <893E5FC8-A2E6-4A5C-AEDB-80FDB6CCBAD4@nc.rr.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"; Format="flowed"
Does anyone care to comment on this latest "El Dorado"?
http://www.prensalibre.com/noticias/Cientifico-respaldo-autoridades-Lago-Izabal_0_439156198.html
Buen viaje! 
Eric
== == == 
Dear Rebecca, dear Listeros, 
I just wanted to let everyone of you know that we (German speaking 
anthropologists/Mesoamericanists) have put online a statement 
regarding the absurd and nonsensical treasure-hunt initiated by 
Mr.Rittstieg and the german newspaper BILD.
The statement (german version) can be downloaded at the following link:
http://www.mesoamerika-gesellschaft.de/Documents/Stellungnahme_Mesoamerikanistik.pdf
Both a spanish and english translation of the statement will be 
posted tomorrow.
The statement will also be sent to major institutions such as 
IDAEH, the German Embassy in Guatemala, the Guatemalan Embassy 
in Germany - as well as Guatemalan and German Newspapers.
 The list of signees will continuously be updated. If anyone 
wants to sign the list to support our statement, please send 
a mail (with your name, academic degree (if that applies), 
institution and/or city) to the following e-mail-address:
izabal2011@googlemail.com
 Best regards from Germany,

Elisabeth Wagner

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About carlos

I'm a curious person, of reasonable intellect, "on the beach" (retired) and enjoying my interest in anthropology, language, civil rights, and a few other areas. I've been a hippie/student/aerospace tech writer in the '60s, a witness to the Portuguese revolution in the ‘70s, a defense test engineer and witness to the Guatemalan genocide in the '80s, and a network engineer for an ISP in the '90s. Now I’m a student and commentator until my time is up. I've spent time under the spell of the Mesoamerican pyramids and the sweet sound of the Portuguese language. I've lived in Europe, traveled in Brazil, Central America, Iceland, New Zealand, and other places. My preferred mode of travel is with a backpack and I eat (almost) anything local. Somehow, many of the countries I have been to have had civil unrest (for which I was not responsible). I'm open to correspond with anyone who might share my liberal, humanist interests. I live in San Buenaventura, California.
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